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Dessert Recipes

Estonian Kringle-Cinnamon Sugar Twisted Bread

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I know I mentioned in my hot cross buns post that there were so many Easter breads I wanted to try.


I don’t think I’ll actually accomplish making a bread from every country. I will just start with a couple.


First off will be Estonia and their  kringle. I found in a recent Donna Hay magazine the same ring but filled with raspberries. I’d love to do that version when the berries are in season. For now, we stuck with this gorgeous cinnamon sugar version. I had come across it on Pinterest some time back and vowed to make it soon. Soon turned into months and now here it is finally! Better later than never.;)
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I have to just tell you how lovely this bread is.

So, so lovely!
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I never really knew what a kringle was before. I found a little info on Danish kringles here. I wasn’t successful in finding any info on the history of this Estonian bread. IF you know any thing about, please share it below in the comment section. If you bake an Easter or St. Patrick’s Day bread this month, be sure to link up to our fantastic #TwelveLoaves party! I'm not certain if it is a traditional Easter bread from Estonia, but will definitely add this to my Easter baking list.

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some notes on this bread: I first saw this recipe a while back on my friend Angie's blog. She did a gorgeous spelt version. I then soon later found the recipe I used here on this beautiful blog: Just Love Cookin. I followed her ingredients for the dough and changed the filling and method a little. I added a little more butter and cinnamon sugar to fill and add on top right before baking. It seems complicated to cut and form the shape but it really is not. When you slice the dough in half, take care to make a clean cut. They you have to carefully twist the open layers around each other. Don’t worry that while you twist around some filling may come out. You have a little extra butter to add on top and more cinnamon sugar to sprinkle on. It’s sort of like an inside out cinnamon roll. And now that I am looking again at these photos and remembering the smell while it baked and the delicious taste when it was ready, I’m inspired to go make another one! It was that good. Some other ways to make this kringle: chocolate chips, sugar, butter, cinnamon, dried fruits

Estonian  Kringle-Cinnamon Sugar Twisted Bread

Dough
2 cups flour
1/2 tsp salt
1/2 cup lukewarm milk
1 envelope active dry yeast
3 Tablespoons butter, melted
1 egg yolk
1 Tablespoon sugar

Filling:
1/4-1/2 cup melted butter
6-8 Tablespoons sugar
4-5 tsp cinnamon

Method:
In a mixer, with a dough hook attachment, add the warm milk and yeast. Mix until blended.  Add the sugar and mix about a minute. Slowly mix in 1 cup of the flour until combined. Mix in the egg.  Add the rest of the flour, butter and salt.  Mix together on medium-low speed stopping the machine to scrape down the sides of the bowl.  Stop the machine to scrape the sides of the bowl and incorporate the flour. Mix on low speed until dough is incorporated. Be sure to give your mixer a break and as you don’t want to burn it out. Add extra flour if needed 1 tablespoon at a time. The dough will be a little sticky but also firm.

Take dough out of mixer bowl and knead a minute or two with a little bit of flour on a clean counter;  form dough into a ball. Coat a bowl with a light film of canola oil.

Place the dough into the oiled bowl (when I put the dough in the bowl I swish the dough around the bottom of the bowl and then flip it over so all of the dough is covered in a light film of oil). Cover with plastic wrap and let it rise at room temperature until doubled in size (about 1-1 1/2 hours).
Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. Dust your work surface with flour, and roll the dough out to a thickness of 1cm.
Spread the melted butter across all of the dough, then sprinkle the cinnamon and sugar mixture.
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Roll up the dough, and using a knife, cut the log in half length-wise.

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Roll up the dough, and using a knife, cut the log in half length-wise.

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Twist the two halves together, keeping the open layers exposed. Form into a ring shape and carefully transfer to a parchment lined baking tray.
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Top the remaining butter and sprinkle some sugar and cinnamon mixture. Cover the dough with lightly oiled plastic wrap or a clean tea towel, and let it proof for about 50 minutes. Preheat the oven to 375 F.

Bake for 30 to 35 minutes, until the top is golden brown.

Thanks for stopping by! Happy Baking!:)
xo
Lora


check out some other wonderful ring cakes:
Food Wanderings' Chocolate Yeast Cake 

Home Cooking Adventure's Cinnamon Braid Bread

Angie's Recipe's Cinnamon Spelt Ring

Chocolate Oblivion's Kringle Bread (be sure to check out her savory version!)



36 comments

  1. I love all you the bread you make Lora. This one is one I'll do for sure.

    Hugs

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  2. It´s fabulous Lora, just the type of bread I like to make. But the thing I love the most is that it´s not too doughy, but also very crunchy. Simply perfect!

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  3. You make the most wonderful breads!

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  4. Lora - your kringle is absolutely beautiful. You do make the best breads!

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  5. This looks beautiful! There was a place in Madison, WI that sold a delicious kringle. I'll have to make my own now that I don't live there anymore!

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  6. Such a beautiful bread, Lora! I love the twist and the cinnamon sugar!

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  7. Lora, this is absolutely gorgeous! That twist is pretty amazing.

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  8. This looks gorgeous Lora. I've been wanting to bake a wreath bread for a while, this month, make that this year has gotten away from me. I hope baking has helped eased your mind and pain of losing your father if even in the slightest. The cinnamon, sugar mix sounds like a good call to me.
    -Gina-

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  9. Oh Lora, I love these photos with the dappled sunlight! Great bread too. I want to try this one for sure.

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  10. i love every. single. thing. about. this. Lora - just love it!!! THIS makes me wish i could eat regular bread - and that doesn't happen often - seriously a wowzer!! (((hugs)))

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  11. This looks completely beautiful! And unlike any breads I've seen before - I need to make this soon!

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  12. My favorite bread! Looks so moist and flavorful. I can never have enough of it and your clicks made it look more yummy :)

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  13. Hi Lora! This is not an Easter thing, we baking Estonians do it quite often and for any occasion. The origins - I have no clue either, it's been baked as long as there's been yeast I guess:) At least my granny taught me to do it some 25 years ago. I personally use a dough with this little sugar with savory stuffings and add, well, a lot more sugar into the cinnamon version. The way it's cut shows the inner beauty so perfectly and the cinnamon gets, like, e v e r y w h e r e. You did it so well! Greetings from snow-drowned Estonia:)

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  14. This looks amazing, Lora! Wish I had one now!! :)

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  15. That looks so nice Lora. Just beautiful and looks so delicious.

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  16. Delicious, Lora! You are really one talented baker! I can't praise you enough...! Can I tear off a piece...? LOL!

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  17. Delicious and beautiful I love to try this one.

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  18. The bread looks beautiful and the texture is perfect, this I must try.

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  19. I just did something similar using challah dough, but I rolled it up in a springform pan. Your kringle looks incredible! I made one once, and everyone kept saying it tasted like a cinnabon! I'm definitely trying your recipe! xo

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  20. Oh my word. This is gorgeous! You did an amazing job with the twisting. The outside looks so cinnamon sugary crispy. Yum! I love learning about new types of bread. Awesome post. :)

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  21. I love this twisted cinnamon sugar filled kringle-so interesting to read about and see your methods!

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  22. This Cinnamon Sugar Twisted Bread is gorgeous. I love that you can see all the cinnamon sugar running through in every bite. Hm...the raspberry one you mentioned sounds yummy and gorgeous. I look forward for your post on that one too.

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  23. Your estonian kringle looks beautiful, Lora.
    Thanks, Lora, for the mention.

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  24. As beautiful as the baked kringle looks, I think my favourite picture is the last one where it is unbaked and ready to go in the oven. What a lovely looking dough and it certainly made a gorgeous looking bread.

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  25. Lora, I love this bread. It's gorgeous with that awesome texture. This is the best thing I've seen all day. Now you've got me wanting to make bread--it's been a while. :(

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  26. Your kringle looks fabulous, and such neat braids. I love the cinnamon sugar topping. I made the one from the Donna Hay magazine at Christmas, albiet with strawberry jam and chocolate chips. It was divine and such a great way to decorate the Christmas table.

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  27. This is gorgeous! I tried to do a braided bred like this once, it was a disaster and I haven't tried again since. You've inspired me, can't wait to try your recipe!

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  28. What a beautiful braided ring! This post might nudge me into trying one for Easter brunch.

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  29. Happy Saturday, Lora! I'm just trying to catch up reading all my favorite bloggers posts this week, and I came to yours. OMG...this looks so darn delcious!!! You are honestly, the best bread baker...this is gorgeous!

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  30. This looks magnificent, Lora! Anything sprinkled with cinnamon and sugar disappears immediately around here!

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  31. What a stunning result! This bread is so mouth watering. I want to make it now. Happy Saturday!

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  32. I have yet to make a kringle bread.
    I love them simply for the sugar-crusted "crunch"--the best part.
    This came out great Ms. Lora!

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  33. yumm love these breads! Great blog.

    Follow back if you can :)

    http://chowdownbythebay.blogspot.com/

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  34. It's not the traditional Easter Bread - I'm 1/2 Estonian, and the recipe we usually use is similar, but it has milk and cardamon in it as well as the lemon zest. No filling. For Easter, we sprinkle ground almonds and coarse sugar on top. You can also put raisins in it. My nana made it every day - it was a staple in her house. It's called mamu saia (mahmooSIGHyah) which literally translated, means raisin loaf LOL :) Here is a link to when I had my blog with some pix and the recipe handed down from my nana, to my mom, to me :) http://eventinacancook.blogspot.com/2011/04/memories-traditions-nostalgia.html (there is also a shout out to you LOL)

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