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Sicilian Orange Sweet Bread -Pane di Pasqua #TwelveLoaves

Sicilian Orange Sweet Bread

When another challenge for #TwelveLoaves comes around, I'm always a little nervous. Maybe not nervous, but sort of anxious. I sometimes think I know exactly what to bake and it involves yeast. I also sometimes think I'm really going to go the much easier route and do a non-yeast bread. I am in love with this Sicilian Orange Sweet Bread...let me tell you the story!

I love baking bread! I love baking yeast breads. I love baking quick breads! Obviously, the quick breads are much easier to put together. There are so many variations in quick bread recipes and a very tempting part in making them is the ease and speed! I'm not saying I'm not ever going to do a quick bread type of recipe for the #TwelveLoaves challenges. For now, I'm still experimenting with yeast recipes.

So far our theme of Oranges, I knew it had to be something for Easter. There are different types of breads that are wonderful for Easter and I've shared a couple here: a gorgeous Italian Easter wreath and these guti di pasqua.
Sicilian Orange Sweet Bread


Here is our fantastic April-Oranges breads from the incredible #TwelveLoaves bakers:

Sicilian Orange Sweet Bread

#TwelveLoaves April: Oranges. The month of March was filled with gorgeous strawberry breads! We have chosen ORANGES for our April theme! Choose a recipe including oranges. Your bread of choice recipe must include in the recipe: oranges, orange marmalade, orange zest. In addition to being in the dough, it could also be added to a glaze. Whatever you bake, (yeasted, quick bread, crackers, muffins, braids, flatbreads, etc) have fun and let's have a delicious month of bread with ORANGES. Let's get baking!

If you’d like to add your bread to the collection with the Linky Tool this month, here’s what you need to do!

1. When you post your Twelve Loaves bread on your blog, make sure that you mention the Twelve Loaves challenge in your blog post; this helps us to get more members as well as share everyone's posts. Please make sure that your bread is inspired by the theme!

2. Please link your post to the linky tool at the bottom of my blog. It must be a bread baked to the Twelve Loaves theme.

3. Have your Twelve Loaves bread that you baked this April, 2014, and posted on your blog by April 30, 2014.

#TwelveLoaves is a monthly bread baking party created by Lora from Savoring Italy.


Sicilian Orange Sweet Bread

When I found this bread recipe that inspired me, I was going to bake it in a round cake pan with the removable bottom. I was looking around my kitchen frustrated because the bottom of the pan wasn't closing correctly and the dough was ready to go to the next phase. I found some panettone papers that I picked up on sale at Sur la Table. I'm still dreaming of baking a panettone since before Christmas. I tossed the dough into the paper and I said a little prayer. It wasn't looking as puffy as it was minutes before in the bowl. I really thought that something had gone wrong and that the dough would never fill my paper even halfway. I covered it and walked away and I didn't even peak while it was rising. I waited and waited and then....whoa!!


The magical thing happened that all bread bakers hope for when working with yeast: this bread rose and it rose to beautiful proportions! See, I added orange marmalade to the recipe and the dough was a little wet. I had to add a little flour as I was combining it and I thought I messed around too much with this dough. I didn't want to give up total hope, but I was prepared mentally to start a different bread the next day.


My husband saw me take it out of the oven and told me I needed to hang it upside down to cool or it will it will deflate.  I explained to Fabrizio that this isn't a panettone recipe. I just happened to use my panettone paper and it is actually a challah dough recipe! No butter, but vegetable oil. I did use the almond topping the baker suggests with this recipe. It wasn't very thick and it does drizzle around the sides. I wiped the sides of my bread. I happened to have pearl sugar and tossed some of that on top too! This is my riff on an Italian Colomba. My sort of faux-panettone.

It really is not much like a panettone, other than the paper mould. But this IS a quite fabulous yeast bread; a very wonderful bread for Easter or any time. Plenty of orange hints throughout the bread (with some bites you get an orange marmalade surprise!). But as my daughter said, a slice very warm is much better with a lovely spreading of Nutella;)

This bread is inspired by a recipe by Paul Hollywood: author of the book Bread.

 Sicilian Orange Sweet Bread

Ingredients
  1. For the dough
  2. 1 package (2 1/4 teaspoons) active dry yeast
  3. 1 cup warm water (no more than 110°F [43°C])
  4. 1/3 cup sugar
  5. 4 1/2 to 5 cups bread flour, or 5 1/2 to 6 cups bleached all-purpose flour
  6. 3 eggs
  7. 1/4 cup peanut, corn, or canola oil
  8. 2 tsp salt
  9. finely grated zest of one orange
  10. juice of 1/2 orange
  11. 1/4 cup candied orange peel
  12. 1/2 cup orange marmalade
  13. for the topping
  14. 2 medium egg whites
  15. 1/4 cup powdered sugar
  16. 1/4 cup ground almonds
  17. 1/4 cup flaked almonds
  18. 1/4 cup pearl sugar
Instructions
  1. In a mixer, with a dough hook attachment, add the warm water and yeast. Mix until blended. Add the sugar and mix about a minute. Slowly mix in 1 cup of the flour until combined. Mix in the eggs one at a time until they are combined. Add another 2 cups of the flour, oil, salt, orange zest, orange juice and candied orange peel. Mix together on medium-low speed stopping the machine to scrape down the sides of the bowl. Slowly add the rest of the flour and mix until combined. Stop the machine as you add each cup of the flour to scrape the sides of the bowl and incorporate the flour. Mix on low speed for about 3 minutes until dough is incorporated. Be sure to give your mixer a break and as you don’t want to burn it out. Add flour if needed 1 tablespoon at a time. The dough will be a little sticky but also firm.
  2. Take dough out of mixer bowl, form into a ball and coat with a light film of canola oil.
  3. Form the dough into a ball and place into an oiled bowl (when I put the dough in the bowl I swish the dough around the bottom of the bowl and then flip it over so all of the dough is covered in a light film of oil). Cover with plastic wrap and let it rise at room temperature until doubled in size (about 1-1 1/2 hours).
  4. While dough is rising, in a small bowl stir together the egg whites, powdered sugar and ground almonds.
  5. Preheat oven to 375 F.
  6. Punch down the dough. Gently incorporate the orange marmalade into the dough. (I added it in spoonfuls. I added a spoon at a time kneading along after each addition, trying to keep the marmalade within the dough and not around the outside of the dough.) I added a little flour at the end and gave it one final knead into a ball.
  7. Add the dough to your panettone baking paper or 9-inch round cake pan with a removable bottom. Let the dough rise until it reaches the top of the pan (or panettone paper).
  8. Bake the bread for 20 minutes. After 20 minutes, remove the bread. Spoon on the almond topping. Some of it may drip down the sides (you can carefully wipe it with a paper towel). Sprinkle on the flaked almonds and pearl sugar.
  9. Lower the heat to 350 F and return the bread to the oven. Continue baking for about another 15-20 minutes. The bread should be golden brown. Ovens may vary so check your bread after 15 minutes to see how it’s doing. You test if it’s done by tapping the bottom of the loaf. If it sounds hollow, it needs a bit more time.
  10. Remove bread. Let it cool and serve slightly warm or at room temperature.

36 comments

  1. I love these kinds of sweetbreads. This looks amazing!

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  2. Oh Lora!
    You knew I was looking forward to your recipe.
    It looks simply stunning!
    I can only imagine the softness of the dough...
    Wonderful, simply wonderful!
    Baci
    Lou

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  3. Lora!!! Oh my gawd!!! so so beautiful!!! Pinned and making a trip to Sur la table or online soon!!! this is so gorgeous! I love that you challenge yourself every month! love this so much!

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  4. That, my friend, that is what we bakers of yeast bread LIVE for! When the dough rises up and exceeds all your hopes, never mind your expectations. What a gorgeous loaf, Lora!

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  5. This is absolutely stunning, Lora! And I love how the panettone mold have it that beautiful height. LOVE.

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  6. Wow, what a magnificent Easter bread! The texture looks amazing...perfect for a nice smear of butter!!

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  7. Are you anxious? You're always great for Twelve Loaves (and not only for it).
    I'm anxious too. I want to propose something new each time.
    Your Sicilian Easter Bread is really great.

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  8. Brilliant of you to use the panettone paper for the bread. What a stunning loaf it turned out to be and with such a light and airy texture. Bravo!

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  9. It may not be a panettone but it certainly looks like one. The crumb is beautiful and your bread looks great especially the top with all those almonds and sugar pearls.

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  10. […] Sicilian Orange Sweet Bread from Cake Duchess […]

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  11. Wow! What an incredibly lofty, gorgeous loaf of bread! I'm loving all the orange flavors too. It's perfect for this season.

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  12. This looks so delicious!! I would love to be involved in this challenge next month!

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  13. What i gorgeous bread and I can only imagine how incredible it smelled and the smell it brought into the kitchen! I love yeasty sweet breads and this is making me want a slice!

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  14. I am with you on the bread. Quick easy and tasty.

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  15. Oh my goodness Lora. Just beautiful. I too was looking for the right pan to bake my bread and found panettone papers that I'd gotten from Sur la Table. Worked beautifully. Great minds think alike. I have hung my sourdough panettone upside down to prevent collapsing. I stick skewers through the panettone papers and hang them from my dining chairs! xo

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  16. Oh Lora, this is just stunning. I can't take my eyes of it. Gorgeous bread and beautiful presentation on this.

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  17. Your bread is simply stunning Lora. I have been trying to stick to yeast breads since joining the group because I want to become comfortable baking any kind of bread too. I am looking forward to trying this, although I am kind of sad that I won't be able to bake it in a panettone paper since here is no way I would find them here. I'm sure I have a 9-inch pan so I'll try it in that.

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  18. Ha, I'm busy taking the easy way out and you set yourself up for a new challenge each month. LOVE YOUR BREAD! The topping is to die for.

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  19. Lora, this is absolutely stunning!! Gorgeous! The texture does look more like a brioche than a panettone, but don't I just prefer it that way! I must try this recipe!

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  20. Wow. I don't even know what else to say. The bread has such a beautiful ... well, everything. I love the color, the height, the topping, all of it. I'm curious about the hanging upside down thing though.

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  21. I'd be anxious too, just thinking about making this lovely loaf. You are a master bread baker, Lora! This is worthy of a magazine cover or the front cover of a cookbook!! STUNNING!

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  22. Whoa, no butter in there? Only oil? That's amazing! Your Sicilian orange sweet bread is absolutely beautiful, Lora. I'm in love with your dishes and the cake slicer. You are truly the queen of bread baking, lady. I'm always in awe of the things you make. And I totally need to hear more about hanging panettone upside down. I've always wanted to try making one because of how much I love eating them!

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  23. Wow- this is a stunning bread and perfect to celebrate Easter! Sur la table has recently opened near me and I will add panettone papers to my list of treasures to buy there!

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  24. What a great recipe, looks so beautiful, I just want to smell it, I bet smell so good.

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  25. Thanks, Julie! We'd love to have you!!

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  26. […] #TwelveLoaves bread baking group is baking with oranges all month long! You could bake a quick or yeast bread and join us in our love of ORANGES. Even if […]

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  27. This looks delicious!! One question, though. I didn't see the initial baking temperature? Did I miss it? Thanks!

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  28. ciao Joann! I start it at 375 F and then for 2nd 1/2 of baking it's at 350F. Hope you had a nice Easter! Buona Pasqua!! grazie. ;)

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  29. Lori,
    I almost missed the party this month but l found a lovely quick bread recipe. Hope you like it as much as I do.
    Annamaria

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  30. The recipe intrigues me especially the addition of orange marmalade. I am thinking that after the addition of the marmalade there is a second rise? It is not clear in the method. Looking forward to making the bread. Yours looks so tempting.

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  31. Yes, let it rise again until it reaches the top of the pan (or panettone paper). It took mine about another 1.5 hours to rise enough. Enjoy the bread!

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