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Dessert Recipes
Dessert Recipes

Eataly Milano Smeraldo {part 2}


Eataly Milano Smeraldo

I'm back with some more photos of Eataly Milano Smeraldo. What is the concept behind Eataly? It really is simple. The best quality of Italian foods are all found in this one gorgeous place. You visit Eataly to shop and learn, and of course, to taste a little bit of every thing. Or at least that's what we like to do!

Eataly Smeraldo is located in  Milan, in piazza XXV Aprile. It is  5,000 sq.m. showcasing incredible food and the the best locally sourced products. All this deliciousness is spread out over 4 floors hosting not only 19 eateries and a starred restaurant (Alice). You could do food workshops and there is even a conventions center.

Have you ever been to Eataly Milano? Are you going to Expo 2015?
Eataly Milano Smeraldo


Eataly Milano Smeraldo


Eataly Milano Smeraldo


Eataly Milano Smeraldo


Eataly Milano Smeraldo


Eataly Milano Smeraldo


Eataly Milano Smeraldo

Eataly Milano Smeraldo



Incredible gelato...hard to choose one!!

Eataly Milano Smeraldo

Eataly Milano Smeraldo


Address: Piazza XXV Aprile, 10, 20124 Milano, Italy

Phone:+39 02 4949 7301


Here's the part 1 post with more photos.

0

Homemade Pappardelle


Homemade Pappardelle

Are you afraid to make your own pasta? Have you been dreaming of making your own pasta? If you want to start with your first pasta recipe, homemade pappardelle could be the recipe for you!

If you have never tried homemade pasta, you are in for a treat! There is no comparing your own homemade pasta to the dry pasta you buy at the market. I know, it's intimidating!! You may not have your own pasta machine. Or you have one, and aren't sure how to use it. And what about this weird name: PAPPARDELLE! What does it mean? The name comes from the verb "pappare", which literally means to gobble up. When you make your own pappardelle, trust me...you will be gobbling it up! Are you trying to cut out carbs? Treat yourself to just this one recipe if you get to indulge once a week!! You're welcome...I just gave you permission to enjoy life like Italians do...pasta is not a sin there! Actually, it is eaten sometimes twice a day (it is sometimes in my house). But back to the recipe...

Sorry for the not so fancy photos. This was a spontaneous event yesterday, as it is most times when we make pasta. And of course, my battery for the camera was dead and my IPhone was sitting right there. Make a post finally on pappardelle, or wait another 5 years? Make a post!! Hope you don't mind...but here it is!!

Homemade Pappardelle



You could make the dough and roll it out on your own (like most good Italian mammas do!) with a rolling pin (what a great arm workout!)and cut it. Or you could use your stand mixer or a food processor.

This dough recipe is great to also make other pasta like fettucine, garganelli, maltagliati and tagliatelle. We Italians are very particular about our pastas and the sauces. There is a reason why certain pastas go with certain sauces. Traditional shapes compliment certain sauces and they are usually made with local ingredients. Pappardelle is a wide and flat pasta and it originates in Northern and central Italy. Because it is a thicker pasta (about 1 inch thick)it goes great with a rich ragu', which is the way we enjoyed it for lunch yesterday. The kids love making the pasta with us. They get to help nonna Teresa in Italy make her famous tagliatelle, it is a messy and delicious affair. The portion we make here is much smaller, we don't have 15 people at our Sunday lunch!
Homemade Pappardelle


Ready to make it by hand? Here are the easy steps: It starts with the eggs and the flour (follow the ingredients below). You first start by incorporating the salt into the flour. Make a well in the middle of the flour, add the eggs and olive oil and start to mix it together. Continue to stir together until you can gather it into a ball. Cut the pasta ball into four pieces and cover with a tea towel (or plastic wrap)and let it rest for an hour. Start with the first piece, roll out on a clean and floured work surface as thin as possible. Add flour as needed so the dough doesn't stick. Cut the dough into the strips (1/4 inch strips if you are making fettuccine and 1/2 inch strips for pappardelle). Continue process with other portions of dough. Portion the strips out into nests and let them rest while you boil the water for the pasta. Cook the pasta in salted boiling water for about 3-4 minutes (until al dente). (Instructions on how to make with a machine are below in the recipe.)

Homemade Pappardelle

 Some notes on this recipe:
There are certain variables that can affect your homemade pasta dough such as temperature, humidity and the variations in flour, eggs and other ingredients. You may need to make slight adjustments to your ingredients every time you make pasta. And pasta dough is not like pastry dough, so this is ok. The first time you make the pasta, you may need more flour as you knead. It could be that the next time you make it the dough is too dry and you need to add a little more water. The end result should be a dough that is supple and smooth. The dough should feel silky to the touch and not sticky or wet.

 Freezing the Pasta: You can freeze the noodles in an airtight container and be sure to use them in the next 3 months. Frozen noodles may take an extra couple of minutes to cook.

Need a great ragu' (Bolognese sauce ...AKA, meat sauce) to with it? Here is one to try, and you can also see my butternut squash gnocchi....so good!!

Are you craving pasta and are crunched for time? Here is an easy skillet lasagna recipe you will love!


Homemade Pappardelle

by Savoring Italy
Prep Time: 30 minutes
Cook Time: let dough rest in fridge for 3

Ingredients (20 ounches pasta)
  • 2 Cups All-Purpose Flour
  • 2 Cups 00 Flour (or just use 4 cups All-Purpose Flour)
  • 3/4 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 4 large Eggs
  • 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil, more as needed
Instructions
In a food processor, pulse together flour and salt. Add eggs, oil and run the machine until the dough holds together. If dough looks dry, add a teaspoon of water. If the dough seems too wet, add a little bit of flour.

Turn out the dough onto a clean counter (or whatever work surface you are using, I use my big board).

Hold the dough with one hand and fold over the other portion of dough with your other hand.
Flatten the dough with he palm of your hand. Keep doing this movement pushing the dough away from you.

Continue kneading until the dough is very smooth and supple. Add a little bit of flour if it is too sticky.
Wrap in plastic and let it rest in the fridge for 30 minutes or even overnight.

Cut the dough into 4 pieces, keeping them covered with plastic wrap or a dish towel when not in use. (If you’re rolling the dough out by hand, rather than using a pasta machine, cut it into 2 pieces instead.) Set pasta machine to the widest setting, roll one piece of dough that is flattened into a 3-inch wide rectangle out into a sheet. Fold the sheet in thirds like a letter and pass it through the machine 4 more times on the same setting, making sure to dust lightly with flour if the dough is sticking. 

Continue to run piece through machine, adjusting to next-narrower setting after every 5 passes, until dough is about 26 inches long. Cut crosswise into 3 equal pieces. Run each piece through machine, adjusting to next-narrower setting, until strip is scant 1/16 inch thick and 14 to 16 inches long. Continue same process with the next portions of the dough. Arrange strips in single layer on sheets of parchment.

Fold strips in half so short ends meet, then fold in half again. Cut strips into 2/3-inch-wide pappardelle. (If you are making fettuccine, run the rolled sheets through the fettuccine setting on your roller.)

Place cut pasta on a flour-dusted sheet tray and cover with a dish towel while rolling and cutting the remaining dough. It is best to separate the piles of pasta. If you layer them on top, they will stick to each other. Cover with a tea towel while you finish prepping the other strips.

Bring a large pot of well-salted water to a boil, add fresh pasta and boil for 3-4 minutes (depending on the thickness, it should be al dente), Drain well and serve with your sauce.
23

Strawberry Panna Cotta

Strawberry Panna Cotta

Summer can't be coming to a crashing end. It just can't be! So I need to catch up on some more recipes we enjoyed this summer, like this strawberry panna cotta.

Panna cotta is a traditional Piemontese recipe (from the Piedmont region of Italy). Panna cotta literally means cooked cream. I know, every thing sounds beautiful in Italiano! There are so many variations of the recipe. It is usually made simmering milk, cream and sugar that has gelatin added to it, that is then cooled to set and ENJOY!
Strawberry Panna Cotta


This luscious cream can also be flavored up the way you like it, most of the times with vanilla (from a pod), espresso, cocoa powder, different spices. I've had it many times served with a berry sauce (or coulis) and that's truly the way I love it! The last time I shared one with you was 4 years ago (what, WHAT?!?)and it was nutella espresso...oh, yes!

 I added these to short glasses, but I did have some leftover and added it to a small ramekin and it's so easy to flip out after it's chilled. My little critic approved of this panna cotta! We have strawberry panna cotta every summer in Italy made by the one and only zia Daniella. She is one of my husband's aunts, and like most of his aunts, she is quite amazing in the kitchen. She is pretty picky and she is pretty exact in all she does. This summer we asked her to make us her famous panna cotta. And she exclaimed, "Ma panna cotta e' un dolce invernale. Non si mangia panna cotta in estate." So, that means, "Panna cotta is a winter dessert. You don't eat it in the summer." And I respectfully reminded her that she makes it for us every time we visit her in the summer. She responded that the reason she started to do that was because my nephew only liked that dessert of hers and she made it to please him.
Strawberry Panna Cotta



Strawberry Panna Cotta

some notes on this recipe:

As I mentioned above, panna cotta is so simple to make! It's my go-to easy and elegant recipe. I know that it can be put together in minutes. As long as you set aside the time for it to chill, there is really nothing to stress you out about making this fabulous Italian dessert. I like to add different flavors to the cream. But my favorite fan at home loves it just like this, with the easy strawberry coulis.


Strawberry Panna Cotta

by Savoring Italy
Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: chill for 4 hours or overnight

Ingredients (6 servings)
  • 1 cup whole milk
  • 1 tablespoon (.25 ounce packet) unflavored powdered gelatin
  • 3 cups whipping cream
  • 1/3 cup honey
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • pinch of salt
  • for the sauce
  • 2 cups strawberries, hulled and cut into small pieces
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • juice of one small lemon
Instructions
Add the milk to a heavy sauce pan and sprinkle the gelatin on top. Let the gelatin soften for 5 minutes. Set the sauce pan over medium low heat. Warm the milk, stirring frequently. Make sure the milk never boils. If it starts to get too hot, remove the pan from the heat to cool.

Whisk in the cream, honey, sugar, pinch of salt. Whisk until the sugar is completely dissolved, about 5 minutes.

Divide the mixture evenly between cups or ramekins. Let cool slightly. Set in the refrigerator to chill for at least 4 hours (or overnight).

While the panna cotta is chilling, make the strawberry sauce.

In a small sauce pan, combine strawberries, sugar, and lemon juice. Cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally. Mash the strawberries while they are simmering. Cook until sauce thickens, about 15 minutes.

Purée until smooth, strain, and keep in the refrigerator until ready to serve with the panna cotta.
11

Asian Watermelon Salad #bloggerCLUE


Asian Watermelon Salad

August is here and it's passing by in a flash! Which means summer is almost over (yes, I'm sobbing silently)which means what better time than now to share a fabulous Asian watermelon salad!

I've recently been looking for more fresh and easy summer recipes. I am used to eating watermelon in all of its sweet and glorious natural sweetness. After just coming back from Italy and enjoying watermelon at the end of every meal, I wasn't sure if I could explore using it in a recipe.


Asian Watermelon Salad


But with another Blogger's Clue Society event upon us and it means a new fun event!

I recently had the chance to go on a sort of scavenger hunt on a blog I’m not very familiar with.  Why was I inspired to make a watermelon salad what does it have to do with blogger C.L.U.E?

The hunt was for a group I belong to called blogger C.L.U.E. and the blog I was given to search through was Kate from Kate's Kitchen.  Kate is a financial planner that lives in Indiana and she "lives to cook". If you have a chance to check out her blog, you will see that is so true! Kate shares stories and great recipes every week! I had fun perusing through Kate's blog with our theme Beat the Heat. I was leaning towards making her bruschetta with cantaloupe chutney and her chile lime watermelon salad. and instead was inspired by her Thai watermelon salad.  The Thai watermelon salad was a Jamie Oliver recipe and I ended up adapting it  with a recipe I found in a Food Network magazine from last summer. The recipes were pretty similar!!
Asian Watermelon Salad


The blogger C.L.U.E (Cook, Learn, Undertake, Eat) Society meets every month in a game of mystery, intrigue, and fun! We are given a theme and secretly assigned another member’s blog; our mission is to hunt through our assigned blog to find a recipe that fits the theme through our eyes. We then head into the kitchen and recreate the recipe and post together on reveal day!

I am always interested in solving a good mystery, so it was only natural that I would be loving this food blogging group: blogger C.L.U.E!

Today is reveal day, and this month’s theme is: Beat the Heat!! Join me in reading about the food hunted down this month in the #bloggerCLUE member’s kitchens!

Asian Watermelon Salad

by Savoring Italy
Prep Time: 10 minutes

Ingredients (serves 6-8 servings as a side )
  • 1/3 cup peanut or vegetable oil
  • 2 small shallots (1 thinly sliced, 1 finely chopped)
  • Kosher salt
  • Juice of 3 limes
  • 2 teaspoons fish sauce
  • 1 tablespoon soy sauce
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1 2 -inch piece ginger, peeled and minced
  • 1 red jalapeno pepper, thinly sliced
  • 4 cups chopped seedless watermelon
  • 1/3 cup chopped fresh cilantro
  • 1/3 cup chopped fresh basil
  • 1/3 cup chopped fresh mint
  • 1 tablespoons cocktail peanuts, roughly chopped
Instructions
Heat the peanut oil in a small saucepan over medium-high heat until a deep-fry thermometer registers 350 degrees F. 

Add the sliced shallot and cook (make sure you reserve the other portion for your dressing), stirring often, until golden brown, about 3 minutes. Remove with a slotted spoon and drain on paper towels; season with salt.

Whisk 2 tablespoons of the frying oil, the chopped shallot, lime juice, fish sauce, soy sauce, garlic, ginger and jalapeno in a large bowl. 

Add the watermelon and toss to combine. 

Let sit 10 minutes.

Add the cilantro, basil, mint and 2 tablespoons peanuts to the salad and season with salt; toss to combine. Top salad with chopped peanuts and fried shallot.
29

Fruit Malt Loaf- #TwelveLoaves

Fruit Malt Loaf

How could it be possible to get in the kitchen to bake? I had to make this fruit malt loaf. It wasn't even an option to not turn on my oven.

What are your thoughts on malt? I like it...I like chocolate malts. I almost couldn't remember the name!! Whoppers! Yes, I like Whoppers. Those little milk chocolate malt balls that my kids will not fight over at Halloween (PS This bread isn't made with Whoppers). They will happily pass them over to me and maybe, if I'm lucky, a tiny bag of Swedish Fish!

So back to MALT! Do you like the flavor? I had to ask my mom. She's here as I'm typing this post and here are her thoughts, "What are my thoughts on malt? It tastes like root beer. It's an off flavor. It's a turn-off. Some people like malt candy. Chocolate malt. Malt beer. And your brother likes that chocolate malt drink. What do you call it?" I respond, "Ovaltine?" She responds, 'Yes, Ovaltine. Just the smell of it gives me the creeps. They used to advertise it all the time years ago. I believe root beer is made with malt. You know who likes to use malted vinegar? Old timers. You go to a fish-fry and see the elderly people with a side of malted vinegar for their fish."

More from mom, " Why are you talking so much about malt?"

Me, "Because this bread I made is made with malt."

Mom, "But I can't taste it."

Me,"Because I only used a couple of teaspoons."

Mom,"Well, good thing. Because I wouldn't have tried it if it tasted like malt."

Sometimes, well maybe more than some, I feel like I'm talking with George's mom from Seinfeld. Really, it's eery how similar they are with their conversations.

Anyway, what is malt, you may be wondering? Here you go straight from wikipedia:
Malt is germinated cereal grains that have been dried in a process known as "malting". The grains are made to germinate by soaking in water, and are then halted from germinating further by drying with hot air.

Any of a variety of cereal grains, including rice, wheat, oats and rye can be used to make malt. The most common by far, however, is barley, which is the primary grain used in the production of most beers and the majority of malted whiskeys.

So you have malt vinegar, malted whiskey, Ovaltine, malted milk balls.

More on malt:

It's found in different products (some we already went over) including flours, malted milk, malt whiskey and malt balls.
There are two types of malt powder -- diastatic and nondiastatic. The former involves the process described above, in which active enzymes transform starches into sugars. This type of malt powder can be used when baking bread to ensure that it will rise. Nondiastatic malt powder has no active enzymes, and is commonly used in drinks for flavor.

Fruit Malt Loaf


I used this barley malt syrup as a sweetener in my bread. Here's what it says on King Arthur Flour's about barley malt syrup:

Malt syrup (barley malt syrup) is made from malted barley that is ground and then briefly treated with an acid to dissolve the enzymes, sugars and vitamins. It is then heated with water to form the mildly sweet, concentrated liquid we know as malt syrup. Although dark-colored like molasses, its flavor is much milder. To create a more "bagelly" bagel (moister and chewier, with a shinier shell), commercial bagel bakers add a small amount of malted barley syrup in place of ordinary sweetener.

What is all this malt talk really all about?

#TwelveLoaves is a monthly bread baking party created by Lora from Cake Duchess and runs smoothly with the help of Heather of girlichef, and the rest of our fabulous bakers.



Fruit Malt Loaf


Fruit Malt Loaf



some notes recipe: I've been eyeing this recipe for a while. I think even before Heather chose malt as our #TwelveLoaves theme! I came across it on an Italian blog and then realized it's the same exact recipe as this British one from Dan Lepard. If you don't have dark ale, you could use your favorite beer. I slightly adapted Mr. Lepard's loaf: I didn't have golden syrup and treacle, and used honey instead. I am in love with dried plums (prunes)in baking recipes, and so are my kids! If you have an aversion to them, just use raisins! This is a really great breakfast bread or a snack bread. Here's what Dan Lepard says about it, " original British "energy bar" - a block of solid carbohydrate that's packed with sugar, bound together with butter and ale, almost devoid of healthy bits - and tastes great. It will keep well wrapped in greaseproof paper, and is best served with a wedge of cold unsalted English butter. The oats are a bit cheeky, so leave them out if you prefer."

I didn't find the oats to be cheeky and loved them!

Fruit Malt Loaf

by Savoring Italy
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 35-45 minutes

Ingredients (1 loaf)
  • 1 3/4 cups flour
  • 1/2 cup whole wheat flour
  • 3 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 5 Tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1/4 cup honey
  • 2 teaspoons malt
  • 1/4 cup dark ale
  • 1 egg
  • 1 cup dried plums, chopped (or raisins)
Instructions
Preheat the oven to 325 F. Line a loaf pan with parchment paper. Butter and flour the parchment paper (or spray with baking spray or olive oil).

In a medium sized mixing bowl, add t the flours, salt, baking powder and cinnamon. Whisk together.
In a small pan, melt the butter. Add the honey and the barley malt syrup. Stir it around gently. 

Remove from the heat, add the dark ale, whisked egg and the chopped dried plums (or raisins).

Pour the wet ingredients into the dry ingredients. Stir together with a wooden spoon until a soft dough forms.

Spoon and smooth into the loaf pan, sprinkle a handful of oats on top, and bake for 35-45 minutes, or until a skewer comes out clean. Remove from the oven and let it cool in the loaf pan.
15

Chocolate-Peanut Butter Pretzel Pie


Chocolate-Peanut Butter Pretzel Pie

What is happening with you? This chocolate peanut butter pretzel pie is all I have on my mind! I can tell you this...there is not much that I want to turn my oven on for these days. But this chocolate-peanut butter pretzel pie is a reason to reconsider. It is really an easy recipe that doesn't even require much effort.

You could even make the pie without baking the pretzel crust. But I prefer to bake it for about 8 minutes. And can I tell you something? I have avoided this pie in my life for some years now! I made this some time ago. There was sort of sheer mayhem with the guests at the dinner party where I brought it. I tasted a sliver, as I wanted to leave more for guests at my friend's party, and my life changed.
Chocolate-Peanut Butter Pretzel Pie



I wouldn't say I'm the biggest peanut butter fan. I might even say I like almond butter more than peanut butter. I didn't grown up eating PB&J sandwiches. It wasn't very common in an Italian household. Even my mother-in-law in Italy was told by her doctor to eat peanut butter last summer. She tried to incorporate it in her diet. I think she had to eat like a tablespoon a day or something like that. She did what she was supposed to do and then she froze the rest of the peanut butter jar.

Yes, she froze it. She freezes every thing (I may have mentioned this before). When she visited us in May, she told me when I'm in Italy that I have to do something with the peanut butter. And we were just visiting her in Italy and I didn't want to offend her. But frozen peanut butter from last year? Doesn't appeal much to me (or anyone in my family). BUT to not offend her, I did have a look at her frozen peanut butter. Luckily, she was too distracted with the oranges from Calabria that she froze (and the pomegranates and chestnuts...I'm not kidding). We had roasted chestnuts from chestnuts that were frozen at Christmas time and they were so good!

SO back to this pie! This is also frozen peanut butter, but not the one my mother-in-law froze.  I used fresh peanut butter and there is freshly whipped cream. There is a lovely and very easy pretzel crust and there is the chocolate peanut butter topping I melted and sort of spread on top. I was trying not to spread it around too much so I wouldn't disturb the filling. It may not look that pretty, but let me tell you something, it was


Chocolate-Peanut Butter Pretzel Pie


Chocolate-Peanut Butter Pretzel Pie



 some notes on this recipe:
I made this pie for a going away party for some friends. I didn't get the best photos of it after it was frozen and set. I had to sneak it out of the freezer to let it thaw a little. I knew there would be about 4 teenagers at the party and I knew this would be something they would like. It seems I should've made two pies, as the kids were arguing over the last slice! If you don't want to make the crust in the food processor, you could put the pretzels in a big zipped lock bag, close it and crush it with your rolling pin. As I mentioned above, I do like to bake my crust. It seems to keep it firmer (at least for me it does). The filling is so easy to put together. I happened to have some chocolate peanut butter that I found at Tuesday Morning. It's so  good! I melted it and dolloped some on top and then added some more crushed pretzels. The teens all proclaimed this pie tastes like a candy bar. But what's nice about this "candy bar" pie, there are no additives. And peanut butter does have protein...so it's sort of good for you, right?


Looking for some more no-bake inspiration? Look no further...here you go:

no-bake limoncello cheesecake

strawberry marshmallow and cracker cake

strawberry no-bake cheesecake

And if you are craving a regular blueberry pie, check out this one! It's quite a pie!

For something more casual, try these blueberry bars the cake batter is vegan).


Chocolate-Peanut Butter Pretzel Pie

by Savoring Italy
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: refrigerate until firm: approx

Ingredients (8 servings)
    for the crust
    • 2 cups broken salted pretzel sticks (I used mini salted pretzels)
    • 6 Tablespoons unsalted butter, melted
    for the filling
    • 4 ounces cream cheese, softened
    • 1/2 cup peanut butter
    • 1 cup heavy cream, chilled
    • 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
    • 1/2 cup confectioner's sugar
    Instructions
    Preheat the oven to 350°. Using a food processor, finely grind the pretzels.

    Transfer to a bowl, then stir in the melted butter. Press evenly over the bottom and up the sides of a 9-inch tart pan with a removable bottom.

    Bake until light brown around the edges, about 6-8 minutes. Let cool on a rack.

    Using an electric mixer, beat the cream cheese, peanut butter at medium-high speed until fluffy, about 1 minute.

    Beat in the remaining 1/2 cup confectioner's sugar.

    In a separate bowl, beat 1 cup heavy cream with the vanilla until soft peaks form.

    Fold the whipped cream into the peanut butter mixture.

    With a spatula spread this gorgeous peanut butter mixture in the tart shell.

    Cover with plastic wrap, then refrigerate until firm, at least 3 hour or overnight. I popped the bottom out of the sides of the tart pan. I left it the bottom on the tart pan and it was very messy when cutting.I had some chocolate peanut butter and melted it a little and spooned that on top (about 4 Tablespoons)and then sprinkled some more crushed pretzels on top before serving.
    21

    Eataly Milano Smeraldo {part 1}


    Eataly Milano Smeraldo



    Have you every checked out Eataly NYC? Or how about the one in Chicago? What about Eataly Milano Smeraldo? We are in love with Eataly and have visited the ones in NYC and Chicago. If you love food and especially Italian food, you have to check out Eataly.

    The NYC one is always very busy. The Chicago Eataly was not as busy as NYC and we even ran into Joe Bastianich when we were there in March. He seems to be a bigger star in Italy than he is in the States (if that is possible). He was pretty chill and spoke in Italian with our son and took a photo with him. Our little guy knew him from Masterchef Junior, so he was happy to see him there. It was funny because we actually ran into him at the Eataly NYC the year before.

    So when in Milan, go to Eataly? Why not? Being married to a chef, it was something we couldn't miss. Eataly was founded in Italy and 10 of the chain’s 27 global locations are found within Italy. Do Italians really like the Eataly idea? I spoke with some people I know (friends and distant cousins of my hubs), and they all mentioned that Eataly is too expensive. With the economic crisis that there is in Italy, Eataly is not quite a reality for many of its citizens. Is it someplace to check out and pick up a few things for these people? Maybe. I didn't ask enough people to get a good enough idea if Eataly is just for those that can really afford it and the tourists.

    The 4 story food emporium is in a building that was once a theater. The 54,000+ sq. ft. flagship Eataly store opened in Milan in late March of 2014.

    There are an anticipated 20 million visitors to Milan in 2015 for Expo Milano, which opened May 1st and runs through October 31, and is focused on the food theme of Feeding the Planet, Energy for Life. 

    Have you ever visited an Eataly? What do you think about it?

    I'm hoping you will like these photos and I will share them in 2 parts (I've taken so many on my Iphone and want to just show you a little bit of what it's like). Part 2 will follow soon after...ci vediamo presto (see you soon!).


    Eataly Milano Smeraldo


    Eataly Milano Smeraldo


    Eataly Milano Smeraldo


    Eataly Milano Smeraldo


    Eataly Milano Smeraldo


    Eataly Milano Smeraldo


    Eataly Milano Smeraldo



    Eataly Milano Smeraldo

    Eataly Milano Smeraldo


    Eataly Smeraldo
    Address: Piazza XXV Aprile, 10, 20124 Milano, Italy

    Phone:+39 02 4949 7301




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