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Anadama Bread - #TwelveLoaves


Anadama Bread

We are back with another month of bread baking inspiration! I know you may be wondering what is an anadama bread!!



As is typical with each month, I wasn't sure which bread I wanted to share. I remembered my gorgeous March issue of Bon Appetit had an Anadama bread recipe chock full of seeds...so that was the bread I would share!


Anadama Bread

You may be wondering what in the world...ANADAMA? I know I was when I first heard it's name!! The bread originates in New England and it is usually made with whole wheat flour, cornmeal, molasses and sometimes even rye flour.  I found the info on this cool site by Joyce White who is an Annapolis based food historian:

"Supposedly, the bread was created sometime before 1850 by either a fisherman or a Finnish stonecutter from the Rockport or Gloucester, Massachusetts areas. The legend claims that a disgruntled husband lashed out at his wife, Anna, for serving him boring cornmeal mush one too many times. In a fit of exasperation, he yelled, "Anna, damn her!", as he added flour, yeast, and molasses to the cornmeal to make something new and different, a cornmeal-based risen bread. Interestingly, a 1936 recipe for the bread in The New England Cook Book, 300 Fine Old Recipes, compiled and edited by Kate Morrow by the Culinary Arts Press has a recipe called Amadama Bread, with an M instead of an N. It is listed this way in both the index and the recipe.


What is known is that according to the records of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, Anadama bread was introduced as a brand of bread in 1850, and the first use in commerce was July 1, 1876 for Anadama Mixes, Incorporated. Around the turn of the 20th century, Baker Knowlton of Rockport, MA made the bread and sold his version of it in horse-drawn carts. Additionally, other 20th century bakeries made and sold Anadama bread throughout the New England region."

Anadama Bread



Anadama Bread


#TwelveLoaves is a monthly bread baking party created by Lora from Cake Duchess and runs smoothly with the help of Heather of girlichef, and the rest of our fabulous bakers.

Our host this month is Lora from Savoring Italy and our theme is Seeds.

some notes on this recipe:
When I found this recipe, I was so excited because I had so many seeds on hand to use. You could totally mix this up with whatever seeds you would like. I used white sesame seeds, ground flax seeds, ground chia seeds and poppy seeds (I LOVE baking with poppy seeds_. I would like to make next with black sesame seeds. I didn't have light molasses and used my regular kind. With a potential hurricane coming our way last week, I didn't have the time to look for the seeds, instead I was searching for water to store here! Thank goodness TS Erika was not as bad as we anticipated and I had time to whip up this bread. Now for the time, it takessss time! You have to really wait for it to rise. I sort of rushed it on the last resting period, as there was a little break in the clouds and I wanted to get at least one good photo. It is a sweet bread that has a lovely texture from the cornmeal. It is an unusual bread that I honestly can't wait to make again!

slightly adapted from Bon Appetit


Anadama Bread

by Savoring Italy
Prep Time: approx 1 1/2 hours
Cook Time: approx 40-45 minutes

Ingredients (1 loaf)
  • 1/2 cup very warm water + more for the dough
  • 1 T (or pkg.) of active dry yeast
  • 1/2 tsp granulated sugar
  • 2 1/2 cups King Arthur all-purpose flour (plain flour)
  • 1 cup fine ground cornmeal
  • 1 1/4 tsp. Kosher salt
  • 1/4 cup mild molasses
  • 2 T softened butter
  • 2 T ground flax seeds
  • 2 T ground chia seeds
  • 2 tsp. White Sesame Seeds
  • 2 tsp. Poppy seeds
Instructions
Mix the warm water, yeast and sugar together and allow to "proof" for about 7 to 10 minutes to ensure the yeast is active--it should get foamy.

In a stand mixer, using the dough hook, mix all the ingredients together. Add the proofed yeast and about another 1/2 cup of water, adding the water slowly just until the dough comes together.

Turn the dough out onto a bread board and knead until smooth. Place dough, right side down into a large, buttered bowl, then, turn right-side-up.

Cover with plastic wrap and allow to rise for about 1 hour. Remove the dough after the rising and form into a loaf (8" x 4" x 4"). 

Place into the buttered loaf pan and allow to rise another 45 minutes.

Just before the dough is ready, preheat the oven to 375F-degrees. Place the dough into the oven and bake for 40-45 minutes, or until a thermometer reads 180F-degrees internally.

Remove from the oven and allow to sit on a rack for 10 minutes before turning it out of the pan. Allow to cool completely before cutting into it.

20 comments

  1. LOL, I love the story of how the name may have come about! I love all the seeds in your bread---it sounds fantastic!!!

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  2. What a delightful story about the background of this bread! Your loaf is beautiful!

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  3. I have always been intimidated by homemade breads. This sounds so good & easy. I'll have to give it a try! Your loaf looks delicious!!
    Thanks!!

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  4. Love the history lesson Lora, and love your Anadama bread! I've made it, but not with seeds. I'm definitely going to try it this way =)

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  5. I only ever heard of Anadama once I moved to New England. Your loaf is absolutely beautiful!

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  6. I first tried Andama bread when we lived in NYC and took weekend trips up to Vermont. I feel in love with it! Your loaf looks as good, or even better, than any that I tried.

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  7. We live in New England and love Anadama Bread! I've heard that story before about Anna and her husband - so funny where some recipe names come from!

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  8. What an awesome story to go with the bread lol. And it does sound wonderful to taste, all seeds added to.

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  9. Love the backstory! Every bread should have one :)

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  10. I have an old Anadama bread recipe too but I really love how you have updated it and made it even better. Never knew that story!

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  11. Love the story behind this bread and foods in general. I always want to bake breads,,,not sure if I am afraid of the yeast or the time commitment. I am a fly by the seat of my pants kinda gal! You are killing me with the butter on the bread...I always say I LOVE good bread, however I sometimes thing it is just so I can get at the butter, lol!

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  12. What an interesting story about bread. Who knew that one loaf of bread would strike up a whole industry! Thanks for sharing

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  13. Love the story about the name! This bread looks AMAZING!

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  14. I've never heard of anadama bread but I haven't met a bread yet that I don't like. I love all fo the seeds in this bread!

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  15. What a beautiful loaf of bread! Can't wait to try it!

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  16. I love making bread but haven't got around to it lately. This version looks superb!

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  17. This recipe fascinates me! Looks delicious!

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