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Korean Steamed Eggs -Guest Post with Hip Foodie Mom #FoodMemory

Korean Steamed Eggs

As I mentioned at the beginning of my #FoodMemory series, I never know exactly what to expect when I receive the stories from my guest posters. I have reached out to some really talented blogging friends of mine.


On a side note, If you are wondering what in the world Korean Steamed Eggs is doing on my blog, stick around and enjoy this post!

When I reach out to a friend to share a guest post with me, I am confident they will be sharing something delicious for #FoodMemory. But I have absolutely no clue how their stories will be. The element of surprise is extremely high and I can't wait to have a quiet moment to read the story they are sharing with me.  I open the email and enjoy every word. Since I'm reading it before all of you, I feel like a secret is being revealed to just me and I'm bubbling with excitement and anticipation. I can't wait to share their Food Memory with all of you, which is for me, a special gift.

Alice from Hip Foodie Mom is a dear friend. She makes amazing sweet or savory dishes. I just love her longevity noodles for the Chinese New Year. How about these Extra Spicy Honey-Sriaracha Chicken Wings...so good!! Her baking is incredible. Alice's Poached Pear Bread is so pretty and this Cinnamon Peach Monkey Bread looks incredible! She has been a part of #TwelveLoaves and #BundtaMonth...so I've got to "see" some of her delicious breads and cakes all through last year. But besides that part of her culinary repertoire, it's the Korean food she makes that makes me HUNGRY! I seriously wish Alice lived right next door. I would trade her cake for a plate of any of her Korean dishes any day of the week. She taunts me not only on Facebook, but even on Instagram. Now she is here to taunt all of you with this fantastic recipe for Korean Steamed Rice (that kimchi peeking out in some of the photos is making me crazy!! Love kimchi!). Besides her great recipe there is the sweet and very funny story of her grandmother.

Here is Alice:

People often ask me if I speak Korean. I mean, I’m Korean but was born here in the United States. I grew up with English speaking parents, who spoke both Korean and English in the house but I never really fully learned how to speak the Korean language.

My parents raised us, speaking English to us but also teaching us all about Korean culture. As my brother, sister and I grew older, they put us in Korean school with the hopes that we would pick up the language and be the good little kids they wanted us to be. Only problem was, we were there with our friends from church so we goofed off most of the time. I did end up learning a little, like the alphabet, Korean numbers and probably left Korean school being able to speak Korean like a 1st grader.

Fast forward a few years, my sister and I were in high school and old enough, in my mother’s eyes, to go to Korea for a summer to meet our relatives, experience the culture and hopefully soak in some more Korean language.

We stayed at my grandmother’s house (my mother’s side of the family) and I remember really enjoying Korea at first but then becoming really homesick. So much so, I remember a phone conversation with my mother, crying and begging her to come home but she replied, crying as well, “I don’t want you to give up. Stay strong and enjoy it. Remember this summer.” I hated taking the subway or walking around to have people stare at me, point fingers, or say mean things to me if they heard me speaking English. I was Korean, after all, and in Korea speaking English. . which would have been ok if I could also speak Korean, but I couldn’t.

My grandmother cooked breakfast (and lunch and dinner if we were home) everyday for my sister and I. At one of our first meals, she made Korean steamed eggs. This was something familiar for my sister and I so we ate the entire thing. And so, for every meal after that, my loving grandmother proceeded to make steamed eggs for us pretty much every single day for the rest of our summer. Sometimes 3-4 times a week but because she knew we liked it, she made it as often as possible.

Because you see, cooking was her love language. How she showed us she loved us; the grandchildren whom she had only met once (when we were kids) before this summer. We could barely communicate and I tried with my broken Korean phrases and used a lot of hand gestures. We didn’t talk much but it was ok. I knew how much she loved us.

 My grandfather had passed away a few years prior to this summer so my grandmother was alone and would soon move to the States to live with us. I remember feeling happy that she was coming and hoping that she would like Texas and our home. I don’t remember much about the times that my grandmother lived with us but I remember a few things. The summers in Texas get hot, like over 100 degrees hot and humid so my cute, little grandmother, with, pardon my French, really saggy boobs, would wear a net top around the house with nothing underneath. Yes, a net, see through top.

What can I say? She was hot. I remember my friend Jane coming over and saying, “Dude, your grandmother is practically naked gardening in the front yard.”

It was my freshman year of college that she would pass away and go to heaven. We got the phone call from my mother and my brother and I drove back to Dallas from Austin to attend the funeral. This was the first funeral I had ever attended. People crying. Everyone was wearing black. Emotions everywhere. My mother and my aunt were a mess. My aunt threw herself on my grandmother’s casket as they were lowering it into the ground. It was a very intense, emotional day.

Even though my grandmother and I did not have the kind of relationship where we could talk to each other about everything, I had so much admiration and respect for her. She took care of her husband, family and children. That was her job. She was selfless and I know without a doubt this is why my mom is the way she is. My mom is just like my grandmother. And she taught me to appreciate and celebrate my Korean heritage, to not be ashamed of it. And to not give a damn what people think. Just to live life happy and with love.

These are words to live by.

So, to celebrate my halmonee, my time with her and the things she taught me, I’m sharing the Korean steamed eggs that she made. Eating this reminds me of her and that summer spent in Seoul, South Korea.

I am truly thankful for that summer and understand now why my mother made me stick it out.


Korean Steamed Eggs

This recipe is probably the easiest Korean food recipe ever. It’s extremely simple to make and quick. If you don’t have an earthenware bowl, I provide another link down below to reference.



Simply bring some chicken broth to a boil over medium-high heat in your earthenware bowl. In a separate, medium sized bowl, mix together the eggs, green onions, bell peppers, red chili pepper flakes (if using), milk and season with salt. Beat well.


Korean Steamed Eggs





When the chicken broth begins to boil, lower the heat to a simmer and pour in the egg mixture, stirring well to combine with the chicken broth. Cover with the lid and let cook for another 4-5 minutes.


When ready to serve, garnish with more diced green onions if desired. Serve with white or brown rice.


" ... live life happy and with love." These are words to live by, Alice. Your grandmother was one wise lady! Thank you for sharing her Korean Steamed Eggs recipe and this special story of her with all of us!

Find more of Alice here:

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Other Food Memory stories from my friends:



Renee and Coconut Cake


Shulie and Shakshuka





Korean Steamed Eggs

by Savoring Italy
Prep Time: approx 10 minutes
Cook Time: approx 10-15 minutes

Ingredients (4 servings)
  • 1 ½ cups chicken broth
  • 5 eggs
  • 1/3 cup finely diced green onions + more for garnish if desired
  • 1/3 cup finely diced red bell peppers
  • Pinch of red chili pepper flakes for some heat (optional)
  • 1 tablespoon milk
  • Pinch of salt
  • Serve with white or brown rice
  • Special equipment: earthenware bowl
Instructions
Using an earthenware bowl, bring the chicken broth to a boil over medium-high heat.

In a separate, medium sized bowl, mix together the eggs, green onions, bell peppers, red chili pepper flakes (if using), milk and season with salt. Beat well.

When the chicken broth begins to boil, lower the heat to a simmer and pour in the egg mixture, stirring well to combine with the chicken broth. Cover with the lid and let cook for another 4-5 minutes.

When ready to serve, garnish with more diced green onions if desired. Serve with white or brown rice.




11 comments

  1. […] head on over to Lora’s blog, Cake Duchess, for the rest of this post, to read the story about my grandmother and for this Korean Steamed Eggs recipe. I really really […]

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  2. Lora,
    Thanks again so much for this opportunity to be a part of Food Memory! I really really enjoyed this one and know that your father and my grandmother are smiling down on us today. I can't wait to read the next post for Food Memory. . Cheers to you my friend!

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  3. Alice, I can relate to so much of your story. My mom is German however she never taught the language to my brother or me. She wanted to raise us "American". We would visit Germany and I couldn't talk with my grandmother (Oma) except, like you, with few words and hand signs.
    What a great tribute to your grandmother and I'm sure she is looking down and smiling at you now.

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  4. Awh, thank you Renee! Yeah, I think my parents were the same way initially but I'm glad they raised us with full knowledge of Korean customs and traditions.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Loved reading about Alice's story - I too am an American born Asian, and my grandparents lived with us growing up. My grandmother wasn't much of a cook, but she did make a mean taro cake. This egg custard is pure comfort food!

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  6. What a lovely tribute to the women in your family, Alice! No wonder you grew up to be a terrific mother, wife, friend and blogger. I was so thrilled to meet you a few months ago...and then Lora recently. One of the best blogger perks is all the new friends. And now I'm craving eggs...especially steamed Korean eggs!!! xoxo

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  7. Lora, I think this is the best series any blogger has created. I love all the stories, the dishes and the emotions behind the words. Alice, I love this post so much. Not only does this egg dish remind me of my childhood because my mom makes something very similar, but I almost choked laughing imagining your lil grandma wearing only a net. Amazing! My grandparents embarrassed me on a daily basis. So hilarious. You're right about your grandmother making this dish to show you her love. She wanted you and your sister to feel at home and what better way to do that than through food? Thank you for sharing, my friend!

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  8. Yummy. Really enjoyed reading this post. It's one of my favs that my grandma used to make us too. Your story of your grandma wearing the net top on the hot day is priceless. Mine did quirky things that embarrassed me too. Hers was the first funeral I've ever attended as well.

    Btw you know what really helps if you are interested in learning more Korean? Well, it worked for me and many people I know....hang out with Koreans that don't speak English and watch a lot of Korean dramas.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Alice, such a wonderful post. I belted out laughing at some point mid-way there. Your writing is beautiful and humorous. A matter of fact humor. So real. Capturing life as is and its comical anecdotes. You captured your loving grandmother in this story and dish so beautifully. Lora, Your introduction to the series and Alice is just as well written and engaging. I was at the edge of my seat curious as I plunged into it.

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  10. Shulie, thank you so much!! I really really love this series that Lora started and am honored to be a part of it. . and thanks so much for the sweet words!! :)

    ReplyDelete
  11. […] Alice from Hip Foodie Mom and her Korean Steamed Eggs […]

    ReplyDelete