Travel to Italy

Travel to Italy
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Italian Recipes

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Italian Recipes

Dessert Recipes

Dessert Recipes
Dessert Recipes

Teresa's Crostata agli Amaretti

crostata
I don’t know if you’ve ever baked in someone else’s home or baked while you were in a different country. It isn’t the same as baking in the comfort of your own little kitchen.

You know exactly where every ingredient is in which cabinet in your kitchen. You know if there is a clear container sitting on a shelf with the flours that is lacking any label will be the sugar and the one near the pepper and other spices will be the salt.

This spring when I had my surgery, my mother-in-law was here to help take care of me. She cooked and baked her incredible recipes every day. One of the recipes she made while here was her crostata agli amaretti. It is sweet pastry dough filled with amaretto cookies soaked in espresso.

I posted it here and you can see the different ways it can be made. I don’t know if it’s the quality of the flour or the espresso, but this crostata was so much better than the one she made while she was here. It could be because Teresa baked this one in the comfort of her little Italian kitchen and knew exactly where to find every ingredient. Whatever the case, I hope you give this crostata a try.

To see what it looks like with  lattice layers on top of the filling, look here.
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Teresa’s Crostata agli Amaretti
pasta frolla
2 packs amaretti, each pack is 7 oz
2 cups cold espresso


Directions Pasta Frolla (Sweet Pastry Dough)

3 cups unbleached all-purpose flour, plus more for the work surface
1/4 teaspoon fine sea salt or table salt
Zest of 1 lemon
1 cup confectioner’s sugar (I use granulated sugar)
1 cup (2 sticks) cold unsalted butter, cut into 1/2-inch cubes
1 large egg
2 large egg yolks

Put the flour, sugar, salt, and lemon zest in the work bowl of a food processor fitted with a metal blade. Pulse briefly to combine the ingredients. Distribute the butter around the bowl and pulse until the mixture is crumbly. Add the egg and egg yolks and process until the dough just begins to come together.
Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured work surface and gather it together. Knead it briefly and shape it into a disk. Wrap tightly in plastic and refrigerate for at least 1hour, until well chilled.


To make the tart shell:

Cut the dough disk into 2 portions, one slightly larger than the other. Rewrap the smaller portion and set aside. On a lightly floured work surface, roll out the larger portion into a 13-inch round about 1/8-inch thick or slightly thicker. Carefully wrap the dough around the rolling pin and drape it over an 11-inch fluted tart pan with a removable bottom. Gently press the dough into the bottom and up the sides of the pan. Trim the overhang to about 1/2 inch and fold it in, pressing it against the inside rim to reinforce the sides of the tart shell. Use the rolling pin or the flat of your hand to press around the perimeter of the pan to cut off any excess dough. Put the lined tart pan in the refrigerator for 30 minutes.

While you are preparing the crostata, preheat the oven to 325 F. Soak one pack of the amaretti in 1 1/2 cup of the cold espresso. Let the cookies soak a minute. With your fingers, drain the amaretti cookies a little and then place the soaked cookies across the dough.

Then dip the other amaretti cookies one cookie at a time on both sides and spread them out across the dough. Keep dipping and spreading them out.

Add the remaining 1/2 cup of cold espresso to the tops of the cookies. If you dipped them well enough, you don’t have to add this extra coffee. Teresa noticed the cookies were a little dry. She always leaves a reserve of the coffee just in case a cookie needs a little more moisture.

Roll out the remaining half of your dough and lay it out across the crostata filling.

Bake on 325 F for approximately 30-45 minutes. You want the crust to be a nice golden brown.

Thank you for stopping by to say “CIAO” while I’m here in bella ITALIA! I hope you are having a relaxing summer. SmileTeresa is keeping me busy with her recipes.

22 comments

  1. Yummm. Can't wait to try this recipe. Anything with Amaretti has to be delicious!

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  2. I've never had this before but it looks so good. You've a very lucky woman to be in Teresa's kitchen. :)

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  3. Hey sweetie... this post made me think! Not only because that crostata looks absolutely delicious, but made me think about my own kitchen and pantry.

    I have a good portion of things labeled just for that reason, for when someone else comes over and helps out, but other things aren't.

    Is it just me, or do others have certain spots for things, as in, spices go in a certain order? :D I find it comforting almost (which is sad) to be able to just reach up and grab a bottle, not having to look, and knowing that it will be the right one. Okay, after reading that back, I admit, I might have some control issues. ;)

    Back to the dish: I've never had an Amaretti cookie, but have enjoyed Amaretto! Will be looking for them on next shopping trip. Looking forward to learning from Teresa, vicariously through you.

    You are so lucky, you are over in Italia, with living history. So much to be learned, not only about food and such, but learning about family. That is just... so cool! :D

    It sounds like you are having a wonderful time, as it should be, as well as having wonderful in-laws and grand-in-laws.

    Enjoy darlin'!

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  4. great photo's and your so creative!

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  5. Magnifico!! Aww my Nonna used to make this, what a great experience!

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  6. No place like your own kitchen. I don't even bother cooking in someone else's home. I get cooking anxiety as it is when I cook for others. I can only imagine how much worse it would be if I was using their kitchen appliances and such. I shutter at the thought. I am envious that you are in Italy. Enjoy the amazing family time and take in all of the sights. Scenery photos for us please.

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  7. Normally I would say that there's no place like your own kitchen. But, since the kitchen you're in is in Italy, um, I'd have to back off on that one. Give me ANY kitchen in Italy! Jealous, I am. I love that crostata. I keep going back up to that top picture and looking at the crust. Simple little swirls of pastry, but they give it a purely European air. I love it.

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  8. Una crostata fantastica! Per una golosona come me è una tortura poterla solo guardare in foto! :-)

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  9. wow, what an incredible torta! I have never had anything like that before, and would never have thought that something so simple could be so good. I love the dough recipe, its so close to what I do make, but I'm sure much better!
    I understand what you mean about cooking in a strange kitchen, when they would send me to different accounts, it would never quite feel right.
    I think the water and the flour in Italy make a difference too.....sigh.....how I miss Italy

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  10. I think this is awesome because I love both amaretti and espresso, so I can only imagine how incredible that filling must be. I had never heard of this crostata filling before. Thank you so much for sharing!

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  11. I hope you are having a fabulous time! This dessert looks incredible. Please send a slice over ASAP!

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  12. wow this is something to look forward, I love how the crust was made.

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  13. Wow...this crostata looks delish...I am salivating already and hungry too. Lora, have fun in Italy and keep posting so that we can have a time of italian cooking from you :)
    hugs,
    Elin

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  14. Lora, this dessert sounds amazing! How nice that your MIL baked this for you. I always love to hear how close you all are :) xo

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  15. I bet you are having a fantastic time! And eating great food! Lucky! :))

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  16. I totally agree...there is no place like your own kitchen. The only other place I feel somewhat comfortable baking is my mom's kitchen. I think I subconsciously must have organized mine after hers :) This dessert looks amazing! Enjoy Italy! I'm so envious of your trip. Eat something wonderful and buy a pair of fancy shoes for me :)

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  17. I always have a hard time acclimating to someone else's kitchen. I remember when you posted this after your MIL made it at your house. I bookmarked it then because it looked so wonderful. Now I know I will have to give it a try! Enjoy your trip!

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  18. Oh, how gorgeous this is. And how fun that you get to compare its deliciousness in both Italy and the states! Enjoy your holiday~

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  19. Looks like the holiday is going very well! I'm sure Teresa is in her glory cooking and baking for you all in her own kitchen. (You lucky, lucky people :) )

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  20. Hi lovely Lora, I'm glad you are enjoying your holiday (I wish I was there with you :-) And this recipe? Just wonderful! You always share the most beautiful Italian desserts. I can't wait to give this one a try. Much love, my sweet friend!

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  21. Yay! I missed Teresa ;) keep posting from Italy, love it :D

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  22. I totally understand! Every time I go home I think I will bake a lot but then...in my mom's kitchen...not the same. This crostata looks fabulous, Lora! I haven't made a crostata in a long time. You just inspired me.

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